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3 Dos and 3 Don’ts in an Interview Part 2 960 640 nbempong

3 Dos and 3 Don’ts in an Interview Part 2

3 Dos and 3 Don’ts in an Interview Part 2

There are a few things about interview conduct that you should know. It is very easy for you to overlook some of these. This article provides you with quick and helpful guide. This is not an exhaustive list. How many of these do you know already? 

Dos

1. Treat everyone you meet in the company as a potential interviewer  

It is easy for you to think the interview starts when you meet the interviewer. It begins the moment you walk through the office door. Every person you meet from that point on can provide feedback that will affect your chances of landing the job. If you’re not in the habit of being polite to everyone you meet (you should be), then remember to make the effort.    

2. Explain why you would do something in a certain way 

When given a scenario-based question it is good to explain why you’d take an action. By taking the extra effort to explain why, you give an insight into your reasoning. Even if the action isn’t exactly what the interviewer expected, the reasoning behind it might be something they hoped you’d demonstrate when they asked the question. 

3. Thank the interviewers for their time. After the interview it can’t hurt to get a thank you message to them, restating why you think you can be an asset to the company. 

Taking the extra effort sets you apart from the crowd. It also gives you a chance to remind them why you’d make a great hire. People who interview multiple candidates can sometimes find it hard to remember specifics. It won’t hurt your chances to remind them what they may have liked about you.    

Don’ts

1. Do not fidget during the interview

You may be nervous during the interview. You need to resist the urge to fidget. Fidgeting might distract your interviewers. You want them to listen to what you say, not watch you fidget. Aside from that it makes you look nervous. Interviewers understand you might be nervous but if you seem a lot more nervous than other candidates, you’re hurting your chances.       

2. Do not avoid eye contact

If you cannot make eye contact with your interviewers, you are already failing the interview. People associate looking away with guilt and other shifty behaviour. It’s difficult to trust someone who won’t make eye contact.   

3. Do not guess when answering questions 

If you’re asked a question and you don’t know the answer, say so. It’s better to say you’re not sure but you know how to find out than to guess. If you guess and get it wrong, you’ve not only shown you don’t know. You have shown you’re happy pretending to know something you don’t. You’ve essentially shown you are happy to lie when you think it’ll benefit you. Not a great quality in an employee.      

Conclusion

These are a few things that will help you increase your chances of acing that interview. One of these might be the difference between failure and success. It’s your responsibility to stack the odds in your favour. Are there any dos and don’ts you would add? Share your opinions with us and help someone out.    

If you would like to discuss this further or have questions related to IT Recruitment in London contact us on hello@sapientrecruitment.co.uk. You can also call 020 7566 1199 or visit our site and arrange a call-back www.sapientrecruitment.co.uk/contact  

3 Dos and 3 Don’ts in an Interview 1024 683 nbempong

3 Dos and 3 Don’ts in an Interview

3 Dos and 3 Don’ts in an Interview 

There are a few things about interview conduct that you should know. It is very easy for you to overlook some of these. This article provides you with quick and helpful guide. This is not an exhaustive list. How many of these do you know already? 

Dos

1. Greet your Interviewer(s) with a firm handshake and make eye contact  

This is good manners and shows you know how conduct yourself during a first meeting. It might sound simple but it’s easy to forget. You might greet the person who picks you up from reception, but do you do this to the interviewers already seated?   

2. Bring 2 printed copies of your CV with you 

Sometimes interviewers are pulled in at that last minute and may not have had time to print out a copy of your CV. How prepared will you look when you pull out a copy for the interviewer? This shows you’re the kind of person that thinks ahead and considers what others might need   

3. Make sure you have 1 or 2 good questions that you want to ask your interviewer 

A great way to show an interviewer you understand the company and what it wants from you is to ask a good question. It also shows you’ve been listening. Done right, a good question can be the final confirmation the interviewer needs to choose you. Here is an example I think works very well as a last question: “Is there anything I can do to address any reservations you might still have?”   

Don’ts

1. Do not insult or harshly criticise your current/former employer 

It’s easy to get caught up and say something unflattering about your last job. Let’s face it. If everything was perfect, you might not be moving. Be strong and resist this urge. It will make your future employer wonder how you’ll describe them if/when you leave one day. You can acknowledge imperfections, if you really must, but try to provide mitigating factors.       

2. Do not interrupt your interviewer 

Nobody likes to be interrupted. A good interview will give you plenty of time to speak. When the interviewer speaks, put all your energy into listening. As a bonus, you come across better when you understand the questions you’re asked. Something you hear may inspire a good question for you to ask at the end.    

3. Do not discuss desired salary 

You may be tempted to ask, or the interviewer might ask you about your desired salary. Either way (unless you don’t have an agent representing you) you should avoid this topic. When money is discussed it takes the interviewer away from considering your qualities, to considering your cost. Make sure they believe you’re the right candidate and salary almost becomes an afterthought (if you fall within advertised range).     

Conclusion

These are a few things that will help you increase your chances of acing that interview. One of these might be the difference between failure and success. It’s your responsibility to stack the odds in your favour. Are there any dos and don’ts you would add? Share your opinions with us and help someone out.    

If you would like to discuss this further or have questions related to IT Recruitment in London contact us on hello@sapientrecruitment.co.uk. You can also call 020 7566 1199 or visit our site and arrange a call-back www.sapientrecruitment.co.uk/contact